• Guerlain: Une Histoire de Beauté

    By Kymberley Baker

    As we all know, when it comes to la beauté, nobody knows how to maintain a strict regimen better than une Parisienne.  For decades, the Frenchwoman has meticulously planned and executed her skincare routine, and there are few brands better known than that of Guerlain.


    Last Updated ( Saturday, 21 February 2015 )
  • L'Art du Jacquard

    By Sue Aran

    The other day I decided to make some curtains for my bedroom.  I knew what I wanted them to look and feel like, but I didn't know what to call the specific fabric.  Was it a brocade, damask or maybe a jacquard?  Even though I'd done quite a bit of sewing over the years, I didn't know if these were different names for the same fabric and then, if so, where would I find the largest selection to choose from?


    Last Updated ( Saturday, 21 February 2015 )
  • Person of the Moment – Guy Savoy

    By Margaret Kemp

    Guy Savoy’s eponymous flagship restaurant is about to transfer across the Seine to L’Hôtel de la Monnaie. Chef Savoy found time to tell BUZZ a few secrets : « I never wanted to be anything but a chef »


    Last Updated ( Saturday, 21 February 2015 )
  • Photo of the week - February 20, 2015

    By Rachael Woodson

    This week's photograph pays tribute to the Carnaval de Nice, which is currently happening on the French Riviera. Taken during the carnival of 1937, and printed from a glass plate negative, the photo here gives us a glimpse of the carnaval's fête de nuit. Smoking torches held by carnaval goers and lit decorations provided a light source for the photographer, creating the shadowy silhouettes and traces of movement seen in this image.


    Last Updated ( Saturday, 21 February 2015 )
  • Paris Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2015 Fashion Week

    By Anne McCarthy

    January and February are always bleak and depressing, so it’s nice to have Paris’ Haute Couture Spring/Summer 2015 Fashion Week to spice up the bleakness of the months.


    Last Updated ( Monday, 16 February 2015 )
  • Le Percolateur: Sunday @ Lazare : Win a Day with Eric Frechon at L’Epicure: News from Virginie Basselot MOF Buzz

    By Margaret Kemp

    Le Percolateur, « ceci » is not a coffee bar, it’s both buzzing bistro and mini-museum showcasing, guess what ? Book ahead for Les Déjeuners de Grand-Mère chez Lazare on Sunday. Win a day in the Michelin 3-star kitchens of L’Epicure, voted best hotel restaurant in the world. And bravo Mme Basselot MOF.

     


    Last Updated ( Wednesday, 18 February 2015 )
  • Photo of the week - February 13, 2015

    By Rachael Woodson

    This week's photo is a found image of Italian sculptor's Psyché ranimée par le baiser de l'Amour, or Psyche revived by Cupid's kiss. The marble piece dates from 1793, and is an example of Neoclassical sculpture, although the emotional energy it portrays is representative of the Romantic period, which was just emerging at the time. As noted on the side of the image, the original version of the sculpture can be seen at the Musée du Louvre.


    Last Updated ( Saturday, 21 February 2015 )
  • Jardin de l'Hôtel de Sens

    By Gregory Ross

    It was a particularly cold day when I visited Jardin de l'Hôtel de Sens. November days in Paris tend to be dreary and it is difficult to wake up in the morning when it is warm inside your apartment with a fresh kettle of tea brewing on the kitchen counter.


    Last Updated ( Sunday, 08 February 2015 )
  • Christian Lacroix Introduces a Bit of Edginess at the Staid Musée Cognacq-Jay

    By Diane Stamm

    Lumières: Carte Blanche à Christian Lacroix, the current exhibition at the Musée Cognacq-Jay, in the Paris 3rd through April 19, introduces a bit of edginess to the staid museum by displaying contemporary creations among the museum’s permanent 18th century collection.


    Last Updated ( Sunday, 08 February 2015 )
  • Person of the Moment: An Interview with Marcia DeSanctis

    By Janet Hulstrand

    Marcia DeSanctis’s journalistic career began as a network television producer. Today she is an award-winning magazine writer, and most recently author of 100 Places in France Every Woman Should Go (Travelers’ Tales, 2014). She has been honored with three Lowell Thomas Awards, including one for Travel Journalist of the Year, for her essays on Rwanda, Paris and Russia. In this interview she answers BP writer Janet Hulstrand's questions about her most recent work, the way she feels about France, and what's next on her agenda.


    Last Updated ( Sunday, 08 February 2015 )
  • C’est Dur d’Etre Aimé Par des Cons (It’s Hard to Be Loved By Morons): A Look Back at Charlie Hebdo

    By Dimitri Keramitas


    Daniel Leconte’s documentary about the trial of Charlie Hebdo for disseminating racial hatred was made in 2008 (a year after the trial), but was re-released after the terrorist attacks which decimated its editorial staff. Both the trial and the attacks stemmed from caricatures of the Prophet Mohammed that the satirical newspaper ran on its cover.


    Last Updated ( Sunday, 08 February 2015 )
  • Michelin 2015 France : Brunch at Le Safran and News from Christian Constant Buzz

    By Margaret Kemp

    Michelin 2015 results : The Michelin Guide, first published in 1900, free until 1920, was created by tyre maven brothers André and Edouard Michelin for the Paris Universal Exhibition.  Brunch at Le Safran, Hôtel du Collectioneur is a delicious experience and, there’s news from Les Cocottes du Christian Constant


    Last Updated ( Sunday, 08 February 2015 )
  • Photo of the week - February 6, 2015

    By Rachael Woodson

    Every February in Menton, a commune located in southeastern France, La fête du citron is held. Nicknamed the Pearl of France, Menton's warm climate has made it a long time producer of citrus fruits. Created in 1934, the Lemon Festival draws over 230,000 visitors each year. It can take up to 145 tons of fruit to create the event's intricate sculptures, as seen in this week's photo.


    Last Updated ( Wednesday, 04 February 2015 )
  • The Tower of Babel - How the French Learned to Speak French -

    By Sue Aran

    I have some French friends whom I refer to as the linguist police.  They never miss an opportunity to correct my pronunciation of their language nor my grammatical errors, often with a wagging finger and a stern reproach. It wasn't until I began to read, Robb Graham's The Discovery of France, one of the most wonderful historical, geographical and anecdotal accounts of France from the Revolution to the first World War, that I began to understand the pathology of their lingua franca.


    Last Updated ( Wednesday, 04 February 2015 )
  • History of the Baguette: Legends, Laws, and Lengthy Loaves

    By Margo Lestz

    What could be more traditionally French than the baguette, that long slender loaf of bread that has become an instantly recognised symbol of France?  At any hour of the day, on the streets of any village, town, or city, you are likely to see the French strolling along with one of these elongated loaves tucked under their arm.  That’s because this ubiquitous bread can accompany their breakfast, lunch, or dinner.


    Last Updated ( Wednesday, 04 February 2015 )

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